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Courses

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+HIST 100, 101, 102, 103. History Matters • 3 credits
A topical course of varied content, designed to introduce First Year students and non-majors to the discipline of history.

+HIST 201. United States to 1877 • 3 credits
Survey of United States from its beginnings through post-Civil War Reconstruction. This course is designed for History majors, prospective History majors, and for non-majors who are interested in historical research, writing, and textual analysis.

+HIST 202. United States since 1877 • 3 credits
Survey of United States history from the end of Reconstruction to the present. This course is designed for History majors, prospective History majors, and for non-majors who are interested in historical research, writing, and textual analysis.

HIST 205. Introduction to Historical Methods • 3 credits
This course serves as an introduction to historical methods for history majors. Students in the course will learn the fundamentals of historical practice, including research, analysis and writing. Students will also be exposed to key ideas in historiography.

+HIST 210. The Atlantic System • 3 credits
An advanced survey of colonial American history from the first European encounter with the New World to 1760. Spanish, Portuguese, English and French settlement in the Americas investigated, with special attention to religious, economic, social and political history. Includes a comparative investigation of slavery in the Americas. This course is designed for History majors, prospective History majors, and for non-majors who are interested in historical research, writing, and textual analysis.

+HIST 211. Asia • 3 credits
A survey course that focuses on political, economic, social, cultural, and philosophical developments in China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and/or India, and examines the influence of Asian nations on the rest of the world. This course is designed for History majors, prospective History majors, and for non-majors who are interested in historical research, writing, and textual analysis.

+HIST 212. Modern Africa • 3 credits
An introduction to African history from 1800 to the present.

+HIST 213. Latin America • 3 credits
This course surveys Latin American History from the pre-Columbian period through twentieth century. Our study of Latin America begins with the European conquest of indigenous people which created a new society that blended Indian, European and African traditions. This course will examine the colonial period, as well as how the Latin American nations have come to terms with political independence and economic underdevelopment. +HIST 215. Classical Europe • 3 credits This course seeks to introduce themes of Classical Culture through the study of a variety of sources including and not limited to historical, artistic, literature, philosophical readings and other media.

+HIST 216. Medieval Europe • 3 credits
This course will examine the political, religious, social, economic, and cultural history of the Medieval West from the fall of Rome, A.D. 400 to A.D. 1500. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

+HIST 217. Modern Europe • 3 credits
This course surveys Europe from the Treaty of Westphalia ending the Thirty years War to the collapse of Soviet Union in 1991. Over the course of the semester we will examine Europe's major historical events, including the major revolutions and conflicts. We will also examine political developments including the rise of the modern nation state as well as the development of the modern economy. Additionally, we will also pay particular attention to the cultural and intellectual developments of the period.

+HIST 250. Intermediate Topics in History • 3 credits
Topics in world or American history, with variable content. This course is designed for History majors, prospective History majors, and for non-majors who are interested in historical research, writing, and textual analysis.

+HIST 306. Colonial America • 3 credits
This course examines the complex origins of American society and culture in the colonial era from the time of first contact until the eve of the imperial crisis. We will explore the establishment and expansion of European colonization in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, paying careful attention to its increasing reliance on Native American trade and African slave laborers. Finally, we will trace the maturation of these colonial societies in the eighteenth century and the imperial rivalries and wars that led Britain to its spectacular, but short-lived, successes in North America on the eve of the American Revolution. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 307. Revolutionary America, 1763-1815 • 3 credits
This course will examine the state of the British Empire in 1763 and the imperial crisis that led the American colonists to declare their independence in 1776. We will explore the narrative and scholarly analysis of the war to secure that independence and the political process of creating and implementing a new constitutional order following it. We will also carefully consider the implications of these events for shaping the culture and everyday lives of both men and women of all races living in America. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 308. Jacksonian America, 1815-1850 • 3 credits
This course examines the dramatic changes in American politics and society from the conclusion of the War of 1812 to the Compromise of 1850. We will explore how western expansion, industrialization, the growth of slavery, religious revivals, reform movements, and political party development reshaped the contours of life in America and nudged the nation closer to the Civil War. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 309. Civil War and Reconstruction, 1840-1877 • 3 credits
This course examines the deep political and cultural fractures that led to the secession crisis and outbreak of Civil War in 1861. We will explore the conduct of the war in detail and consider its many lasting impacts on American society and culture. Finally, we will assess the intentions and outcomes of the critical efforts to heal the nation's wounds and promote greater justice for all citizens during the contested era of Reconstruction following the war. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 310. Gilded Age and Progressive Era,
1877-1920 • 3 credits
This course focuses upon the changes wrought in America by industrialization, urbanization, and immigration, as well as the responses of urban and agrarian reformers to these changes. This course is designed for History majors, prospective History majors, and for non-majors who are interested in historical research, writing, and textual analysis. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 311. United States, 1917-1945 • 3 credits
This course examines America's role in the First and Second World Wars, as well as the interwar era marked by the Roaring Twenties, Great Depression, and New Deal. This course is designed for History majors, prospective History majors, and for non-majors who are interested in historical research, writing, and textual analysis. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 312. United States since 1945 • 3 credits
This course examines America's rise to world power after the Second World War, and the political, economic, racial, and social fabric of postwar America, with special emphasis on the Cold War and freedom movements of the 1950s-1970s. This course is designed for History majors, prospective History majors, and for non-majors who are interested in historical research, writing, and textual analysis. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 317. The Vietnam Wars • 3 credits
This course addresses French and American involvement in Vietnam and Southeast Asia from the 19th century until the normalization of US-Vietnamese relations in the 1990s with particular emphasis on the wars waged in Indochina by France, the US, Vietnam, and Cambodia in the 20th century. This course is designed for History majors, prospective History majors, and for non-majors who are interested in historical research, writing, and textual analysis. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 318. American Women: Topics • 3 credits
This topical course covers the history of women in the United States, with particular emphasis on themes of work, family, reform, race, ethnicity, and feminism. This course is designed for History or Women's Studies majors, prospective History or Women's Studies majors, and for non-majors who are interested in historical research, writing, and textual analysis. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course or WMST 201.

+HIST 319. African American Experience: Topics • 3 credits
This course will examine topics related to African-American history by studying primary documents, historical texts, and various media. This course is designed for History majors, prospective History majors, and for non-majors who are interested in historical research, writing, and textual analysis. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 320. European Topics: Christianity and Culture, Early and Medieval • 3 credits
This is a course in the History interaction between religion, namely early Catholicism and culture, primarily in the West from the earliest accounts of Christianity to the end of the Renaissance period. As it is a course in intellectual history, the main focus will be on the ideas that shaped both the faith and the society in which it grew, and the culture shaped by the dynamic between the two. This course will involve a survey of primary source documents such as legal and governing texts, theological and spiritual, works of literature, philosophical works, history, and works of art. Special attention will be given to the connection between political events and cultural and intellectual trends. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

+HIST 321. Ancient Greece • 3 credits
A survey of the history and culture of Greece from Mycenaean times through the death of Alexander the Great. This course will involve a survey of primary source documents such as legal and governing texts, classical works of literature philosophical works, history, and works of art. Special attention will be given to the connection between political events and cultural and intellectual trends. Prerequisites: HIST 205.

+HIST 322. Rome • 3 credits
This course is a survey of Roman history from the founding of the city in the eighth century BC to the collapse of the Western Empire in the fifth century AD. This course will involve a survey of primary source documents such as legal and governing texts, classical works of literature (Epic, Comedy, Tragedy, poetry), philosophical works, history, and works of art. Special attention will be given to the connection between political events and cultural and intellectual trends. Prerequisites: HIST 205.

+HIST 323. Medieval Ireland • 3 credits
This course considers Irish history from the earliest times to 1400. This period is of crucial importance in understanding the totality of Irish history. This course not only covers the range of continuities and radical discontinuities that marked Ireland's development during this time, but charts the attempted conquest of the entire country by the English Crown. We will read a variety of sources to attempt to understand and appreciate the Medieval Irish contribution to learning in general and the influence of the Irish on England and the Continent. Prerequisites: HIST 205.

+HIST 324. Medieval Britain • 3 credits
This course will examine the political, religious, social, economic, and cultural history of Britain from approximately A.D. 400 to A.D. 1603, in order to establish a firm foundation of the historical record of British history and its unique contributions to European and British history. Prerequisites: HIST 205.

+HIST 325. Renaissance • 3 credits
This course is a survey of the history and culture of Western Europe Between 1300 and 1517. The course studies the effect of the events and movements of this period on political, ecclesiastical, social, and intellectual life, as well as on the art and architecture of the time. This course will involve a survey of primary source documents such as legal and governing texts, classical works of literature, philosophical works, theological works and works of art. Prerequisites: HIST 205.

+HIST 326. European Reformations • 3 credits
This course will investigate the period of time from about the end of the fifteenth century to the end of the seventeenth century, the period of time during which the nominal unity of European Christendom was forever altered by the growth of new Protestant churches. The major focus include, people and ideas that helped to shape our modern world: the growth of individualism, capitalism, secularism, the scientific revolution, and the new ideas concerning God and human's place in the universe. The course studies the effect of the events and movements of this period on political, ecclesiastical, social, and intellectual life, as well as on the art and architecture of the time. Prerequisites: HIST 205.

+HIST 330. American Immigration • 3 credits
Explores how migrants from Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean transformed America into a diverse and pluralistic society, made possible America's emergence as an industrial power, and continue to shape public policy debates. This course is designed for History majors, prospective History majors, and for non-majors who are interested in historical research, writing, and textual analysis. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 336. The Irish in America • 3 credits Examines many different aspects of the Irish-American experience in order to place the Irish-American story within the larger context of migration history. This course is designed for History majors, prospective History majors, and for non-majors who are interested in historical research, writing, and textual analysis. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 337. Northern Ireland • 3 credits
An examination of the causes and characteristics of "the troubles" in Northern Ireland. This course is designed for History majors, prospective History majors, and for non-majors who are interested in historical research, writing, and textual analysis. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 338. Modern Ireland • 3 credits
A study of modern Irish history since the 16th century. This course is designed for History majors, prospective History majors, and for non-majors who are interested in historical research, writing, and textual analysis. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 339. The British Empire • 3 credits
A study of the British Empire since the sixteenth century. The course will examine the Empire from the perspective of both colonizers and the colonized. This course is designed for History majors, prospective History majors, and for non-majors who are interested in historical research, writing, and textual analysis. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 340. Modern Britain: 1603 to present • 3 credits
The study of modern British history from the Stuart dynasty to the present. The course explores Britain's emergence as the world's preeminent industrial nation while examining its rise and fall as a world power. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course; sophomore status.

+HIST 341. 18th Century Europe • 3 credits This course surveys Europe from the Treaty of Westphaliaending the Thirty years War to the defeat of Napoleon and the end of the French Revolution. These 160 or so years laid the foundation for the modern European civilization which followed in the wake of the French Revolution. Over the course of the semester we will examine Europe's political development including the rise of the modern nation state and of absolutism, as well as the development of the modern economy. We will also pay particular attention to the cultural and intellectual developments of the period, including the scientific revolution, the Age of Reason and the Enlightenment, as well as the French Revolution. This course should serve to give foundation of modern European history, as well as provide a further development of your skills in historical methods and in historical means of thinking. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 342. 19th Century Europe • 3 credits This course surveys Europe from the Congress of Vienna ending the Napoleonic Wars and the French Revolution to the First World War period. These 99 years or so play a crucial role in European and World civilization. Over the course of the semester, we will examine Europe's political development including the rise of the modern mass politics and of World Empire, as well as the development of the Industrial Revolution and the modern economy. We will also pay particular attention to the cultural and intellectual developments of the period, including Romanticism, Positivism, Liberalism, Conservatism and Socialism. This course should serve to give foundation of modern European history, as well as provide a further development of your skills in historical methods and in historical means of thinking. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 343. 20th Century Europe and the World • 3 credits
This course surveys Europe and the World from the First World War to the present day. This period has been one of radical transformation, both in Europe and the larger world. Over the course of the semester we will examine Europe's political, economic, and social development and transformation, including the profound transformation caused by two incredibly devastating wars. We will also examine the larger world, paying particular attention to the decolonization and the creation of a bipolar world. We will also pay particular attention to the cultural and intellectual developments of the period, including the Russian Revolution, post-World War One anxiety, the Spanish Civil War, post-Colonialism, and the New Left. This course should serve to give foundation of modern European history and to lesser extent world history, as well as provide a further development of your skills in historical methods and in historical means of thinking.
Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 344. Spanish Civil War • 3 credits This course surveys the Second Spanish Republic, the Spanish Civil War, and Franco's Dictatorship. It will examine the ideological, political, social, military, and economic issues and the events of Spain during the 1930's, with particular focus on the Civil War itself. Emphasis will be placed on the intellectual and political movements that drove Spain to civil war. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

+HIST 345. European Topics: Life, Liberty, and Leviathan • 3 credits
This course will examine the political theory of natural rights, a concept crucial to understandings of democracy and modern politics. The course will survey thinkers from the Renaissance period through the nineteenth century. Special attention will be paid to the intellectual traditions of Britain and France, the countries where the "natural rights" tradition has had the most profound impact. The goal of this course is to give the students a deeper understanding of the ideas that have shaped our world. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

+HIST 346. European Topics: Books and Barricades: Revolutionary Political Theory • 3 credits
This course will examine the revolutionary political and social theory in the 19th and 20th century. From Marx's first book in 1845 to the French upheavals of 1968, the history of revolution theory in Europe has largely been a debate between the various branches of the European left, primarily between Marxists and anarchists, or between Marxist orthodoxy and anarchist-inspired, left Marxist alternatives. The intellectual struggle between these factions will be the subject of our course. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

+HIST 350. Advanced Topics in History • 3 credits
This course will focus upon topics in world or American history, with variable content. This course is designed for History majors, prospective History majors, and for non-majors who are interested in historical research, writing, and textual analysis. Prerequisites: HIST 100 or 200 level course.

HIST 393. Directed Readings in History • 3 credits Readings in areas of historical interest not provided by other history courses. Open only to junior and senior history majors with prior approval of instructor and department chair. Prerequisites:

HIST 100 or 200 level course; junior/senior status; instructor consent.

WI-HIST 400. Senior Seminar in World History • 3 credits
This course is a topical seminar in world history that emphasizes historiography, research in primary sources, and - through peer review and revision - writing in the discipline of history. Open only to history majors. Prerequisites: HIST 205, ENGL 101.

WI-HIST 401. Senior Seminar in American History • 3 credits
This course is a topical seminar in American history that emphasizes historiography, research in primary sources, and - through peer review and revision - writing in the discipline of history. Open only to history majors. Prerequisites: HIST 250, ENGL 101.

WI-HIST 410. Capstone Research Experience • 3 credits
This course is the honors capstone research course for History majors. Students will hone their skills as historians byundergraduate history major and you will have to synthesize the skills you learned in HIST 205 and other history courses. Students will, in individual consultation with a full time faculty member of their choice, choose a specific research topic, conduct primary source research, write a substantial piece of historical writing, and present their work at departmental conference. Prerequisites: HIST 205; instructor consent required.

HIST 415. Why History Matters to Me • 1 credit
History majors will give a Power-Point presentation in which they answer two questions: 1. What are the most important historical lessons that you have learned from your coursework? 2. How has your History major prepared you to get a job or get accepted by a graduate school and to succeed in your next career step? In their presentations, students are expected to utilize evidence from their courses. Prerequisites: HIST 410.