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honors program

 

2015-2016 Honors I Course Guide

HONORS 101 and 102 Course Options: First Year Students

Fall Semester (A)

Honors 101A  |  Peace Walls or Bloody Borders

Why are humans so prone to warfare? How do borders and walls both promote peace and enhance conflict? What are the challenges to forging a sustainable peace among individuals and societies?

HON 101A will explore religious ideas that can be seen as root causes of both conflict and resolution while observing these ideas in action in specific episodes of warfare in European and early American history. After laying these foundations, the course, will culminate in an elaborate role playing game that will ask students to embody various competing interests in the midst of the French and Indian War on the colonial American frontier. Through this exercise, students will get a taste for the distinct challenges that must be overcome to seek true reconciliation and lasting peace.

HON 101A will be integrated with service learning (SLVN 201A) and speaker series (HON 112A), which will provide an even wider range of disciplinary perspectives on war and peace in the world. Honors 101A will meet a Humanities and Theology gen ed.

Honors 112A  |  Speaker Series

HON 112A further explores the topic addressed in Honors 101 through presentations by St. Ambrose faculty and staff and guest speakers from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.

Spring Semester (A)

Honors 102A  |  War & Peace in Northern Ireland, Korea and the Middle East

How do borders and walls both promote peace and enhance conflict? In this course, we will study three contemporary flashpoints – the Northern Ireland Troubles, the Korean conflict, and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict – and analyze how borders and walls have been used by the protagonists both for war and for peace. By the end of the course, students will acquire a deeper and richer understanding of three crucial conflicts taking place in three different world regions. Honors 102A will meet a Social Science gen ed.

Fall 2015

Course Section Course Title Professors Gen Eds Fulfilled Credits
HON-101-A War & Peace: Lecture Dr. Larry Skillin & Dr. Matthew Coomber Humanities + Theology 4
SVLN 201-A Service Learning Jessica Nash 1
HON 112-A Speaker Series Dr. Allison Ambrose 1

Spring 2016

HON-102-A War & Peace: Lecture Dr. Duk Kim & Dr. Ryan Dye Social Science 3


Fall Semester (B)

Honors 101B  |  Contagion

Investigation of cultural, economic, political, social and biological aspects of infectious disease transmission from the plagues of the Middle Ages through the emerging diseases of the mid-21st century. Principles of epidemiology and risk assessment will be used to determine the true threat posed by potential disease, differentiating pandemics from panics.

HON 101B will be integrated with service learning (SLVN 201B) and speaker series (HON 112B). Honors 101B will meet a Biology and Social Science gen ed.

Honors 112B  |  Speaker Series

HON 112B further explores the topic addressed in Honors 101 through presentations by St. Ambrose faculty and staff and guest speakers from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.

Spring Semester (B)

Honors 102B  |  Evil & Hope

This seminar is intended to be an exploration of the meaning, origins and manifestations of evil, in history and in everyday human experience, and of the sources and reasons for hope--both theoretical and practical--in the face of such evil. Honors 102B will meet a Philosophy gen ed.

Fall 2015
Course Section Course Title Professors Gen Eds Fulfilled Credits
HON-101-B     Contagion: Lecture Dr. Sarah Vordtriede-Patton & Dr. Sandra Quinn Biology + Social Science 4
SVLN-201-B   Service Learning Jessica Nash 1
HON-112-B    Speaker Series Dr. Marianne Fenn 1
Spring 2016
HON-102-B Evil & Hope: Lecture Dr. Brett Billman & Dr. Alfredo Mac Laughlin Philosophy 3




HONORS 201 Course Options: Sophomores

Fall Semester (A)

Honors 201A  |  Aesthetics and the Evolution of Art

Philosophers are fond of asking questions like "What is art"? We will ask that question in class, but we will also ask more specific questions relevant to life in our contemporary world: "What is it that makes art so bad?" "Is there value to offensive art?" "Can something be both politically motivated expression and good art?" "To what extent are art and religion compatible, and in what ways are they fundamentally different?" In response to these and other questions, our class will evaluate artistic creations of various forms.  Some of these include, but are not limited to: painting, sculpture, fiction, poetry, theatre, dance, music, cuisine, video, humor, body art. Honors 201A will meet a Philosophy gen ed.

Fall 2015

HON-201-A  Aesthetics and the Evolution of Art, 3 credits
Dr. Tadd Ruetenik, Philosophy

Spring Semester (A/B)

Honors 201  |  Broken Bodies: Literature of the Diseased, Disabled, and Distraught

Straddling both the fiction and non-fiction realms of literature on "broken bodies", this class will unravel the experience of the diseased, disabled and distraught (mentally ill). By examining portrayals of established, fictional literary characters throughout centuries, we will explore this defined (often romantic, and often monstrophic) image and experience of these groups, establishing a point of comparison agains the characters' non-fiction counterparts, as detailed in their poignant memoir writings. Beyond the text, students will also be challenged to encounter and reflect on the diseased, disabled or distraught through firsthand ethnographic fieldwork, observing and interviewing a distinct group of their choice. The culminating course paper will be a memoir detailing their interactions with this community and their new understanding of the community's authentic experience. Honors 201A will meet a Humanities gen ed.

Honors 201B  |  Modern Crime Literature

This course has a twofold emphasis: (1) an examination (including class discussions and activities) of the development of intensive writing skills through the examination of relevant contemporary crime related issues, beginning with the discussion of women's prisons in Orange is the New Black, then moving on to the memoir of an LA gang member in the book Monster, and ending in a discussion of the book about the meth epidemic's effect on small town Iowa in Methland; and (2) developing writing skills, such as how to format papers, appropriate use of source materials, and how to write running chapter journal entries in which students summarize their understandings.  Honors 201B will meet a Social Science gen ed.

Spring 2016
Course Section Course Title Professor Gen Eds Fulfilled Credits
HON-201-A

Broken Bodies: Literature of the Diseased, Disabled, and Distraught

Lindsay Schaefer Humanities 3
HON-201-B

Modern Crime Literature

Dr. Grant Tietjen Social Science 3