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2013-14 Honors I Course Guide

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HONORS 101 Course Options: First Year Students

Honors 101A (Fall)

War & Peace

Why are humans so prone to warfare? How do borders and walls both promote peace and enhance conflict? What are the challenges to forging a sustainable peace among individuals and societies? Students will explore religious and political ideas that are root causes for both war and peace while observing these ideas in action in specific historical episodes.

HON 101A will explore war and peace by examining Biblical and historical traditions, culminating in an elaborate role playing game set during the French and Indian War. HON 101A will be integrated with service learning (SLVN 201A) and speaker series (HON 112A), which will provide an even wider range of disciplinary perspectives on war and peace in the world. Honors 101A will meet a Humanities and Theology gen ed.

Honors 102A (Spring)

War & Peace

How do borders and walls both promote peace and enhance conflict? In this course, we will study three contemporary flashpoints – the Northern Ireland Troubles, the Korean conflict, and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict – and analyze how borders and walls have been used by the protagonists both for war and for peace. By the end of the course, students will acquire a deeper and richer understanding of three crucial conflicts taking place in three different world regions.

Fall 2012
Course Section Course Title Professors Gen Eds Fulfilled Credits
HON-101-A War & Peace: Lecture Dr. Larry Skillin & Dr. Matthew Coomber Humanities + Theology 4
SVLN 201-A Service Learning Jessica Nash 1
HON 112-A

Speaker Series

Dr. Denise Kall 1
Spring 2013
Course Section Course Title Professors Gen Eds Fulfilled Credits
HON-102-A War & Peace: Lecture Dr. Duk Kim & Dr. Ryan Dye Social Science 3

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Honors 101B (Fall)

Truth Claims

Advertisers, politicians, teachers, and others often expect us to believe claims because they are "based on scientific evidence." But what is scientific evidence, and why should we believe it? We live in a society in which TALKING LOUDLY often supersedes a concrete understanding of specific issues. The Truth Claims learning community will examine how the scientific method can help you separate fluff claims from what might be closer to the truth.

HON 101B examines aims, methods, and limits of science from the perspectives of philosophy and research practitioners. HON 101B will be integrated with service learning (SVLN 201B) and speaker series (HON 112B), which will provide an even wider range of disciplinary perspectives on identifying critical issues in the design, process, and interpretation of research and disparities between ideals and practice of science. Honors 101B will meet a Social Science and Philosophy gen ed.

Honors 102B (Spring)

Sustainability in Medieval Europe

Joining historical and literary approaches, we will examine documents written by monks and poets, as well as artistic and musical works, to explore physical, social, and spiritual practices aimed at preserving forests, fields, monasteries, churches, and texts, the life of the mind, and most significantly, the eternal life of the soul. Tools to till the soil were seen as equally important as tools to instill virtue such as manuscript illumination, allegory, chant, and prayer.

Fall 2012
Course Section Course Title Professors Gen Eds Fulfilled Credits
HON-101-B Truth Claims: Lecture Dr. Tanya Randle & Dr. Martin Hansen  Social Science + Philosophy 4
SVLN-201-B Service Learning Jessica Nash 1
HON-112-B Speaker Series Dr. Brenda Peters 1
Spring 2013
Course Section Course Title Professors Gen Eds Fulfilled Credits
HON-102-B Sustainability in Medieval Europe Dr. Dan La Corte & Dr. Nancy Hayes Humanities 3


HONORS 201 Course Options: Sophomores

Honors 201A (Fall)

Vertebrate Life

This interdisciplinary course examines vertebrate life from the perspectives of biology, geology, history and psychology. The course focuses on the evolution and biodiversity of major vertebrate groups, living and extinct. It challenges students to evaluate evidence from different fields of the natural sciences. It also examines the history and evolution of human understanding of vertebrate life: from the perspectives of Greek philosophers, through the development of comparative anatomy in the 18th and 19th centuries, to modern concepts incorporating molecular biology and computer modeling.

The course concludes with an assessment of claims of monstrous or relictual vertebrates (cryptids), challenging students to evaluate claims using evidence from biology, history and psychology.

Fall 2013
Course Section Course Title Professor Gen Eds Fulfilled Credits
HON-201-A Vertebrate Life Dr. Neil Aschliman Natural Science 3

Honors 201B (Spring)

For the Beauty of the Earth-Applying Aesthetics to Environmental Sustainability

In this course we will look at nature from the perspective of philosophy, theology, literature, and the arts in order to understand what 'beauty' means and how nature is variously perceived as beautiful (or ugly, or dangerous).

Successful students will understand how our perspectives of nature determine our response to it and will examine how the discipline of aesthetics can re-frame our perspectives in such a way that we work to sustain nature's beauty.

Spring 2014
Course Section Course Title Professor Gen Eds Fulfilled Credits
HON-201-B

For the Beauty of the Earth-Applying Aesthetics to Environmental Sustainability

Fr. Bud Grant Theology 3