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2014-15 Honors I Course Guide

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HONORS 101 Course Options: First Year Students

Honors 101A (Fall)

Through the Looking Glass

How do cultural values and personal experiences influence our ideas about femininities, masculinities, and the gender spectrum? How do these ideas influence how people communicate, how people are viewed, and how people are treated? Are gender values reflected in how we live our lives and in our dealings with others? Is it possible to influence individual and social views of gender?

This is a team-taught course that introduces students to the thematic impact of gender on artistic expression and communication patterns. Students will experiment with beginning painting techniques to visually communicate form and substance related to gender ideologies and examine gendered influences on verbal, nonverbal, and mass mediated forms of expression. Oral, written, and design projects will be emphasized. HON 101A will be integrated with service learning (SVLN 201A) and speaker series (HON 112A), which will provide an even wider range of disciplinary perspectives on the exploration of visual expression and social views on gender. Honors 101A will meet a creative arts and oral communication general education requirement.

*Honors 102A (Spring 2015) will continue the gender theme as it explores how gender intersects with the criminal justice system, in particular, the management, supervision, and treatment of female offenders. Honors 102A will fulfill a humanities general education requirement.

Fall 2014
Course Section Course Title Professors Gen Eds Fulfilled Credits
HON 101-A

Through the Looking Glass:Lecture

Dr. Carla Stevens & Dr. Clea Felien Communication + Creative Arts 4
SVLN 201-A Service Learning Jessica Nash 1
HON 112-A Speaker Series Dr. Denise Kall 1

Honors 102A (Spring)

Gender & Justice

This course will continue the exploration from Honors 101 of the theme of gender, from the perspectives of two additional disciplines: criminal justice and women's studies. Students will examine how gender intersects with the criminal justice system, in particular the management, supervision, and treatment strategies. Topics include pathways to offending, history of female incarceration, gender sensitive supervision challenges, and gender-responsive strategies to re-entry and policy implementation. Students will also examine how stereotypes about masculinity impact crime. Finally, students will use intersectional analysis to explore how gender, race, and class combine to impact human rights.

Spring 2015
Course Section Course Title Professors Gen Eds Fulfilled Credits
HON 102-A Gender & Justice Dr. Katy Strzepek & Dr. Nicole Pizzini Humanities 3

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Honors 101B (Fall)

Grappling with Evil

Tornados, cancer, war, poverty, violence: our world presents us with countless occasions to confront evil and to ponder why seemingly unjust things happen to innocent victims. From ancient burial artifacts to the modern movie screen, much of human culture has tried to make sense of all that seems evil and unjust.


For centuries philosophy and theology have grappled with the problem of evil. In this class, so will we, exploring the ideas and questions about evil presented in movies, novels, poetry, and a variety of other forms of expression from across the centuries. Honors 101B will be integrated with service learning (SVLN 201B) and speaker series (HON112B). Honors 101B is a team-taught course and will meet a philosophy and theology general education requirement.


*Honors 102 B (Spring 2015) will continue the injustice theme by examining the ethical, theological, and historical issues associated with hunger, food scarcity, food technologies, climate change, and disparities between the First World and developing nations. Honors 102B will meet a humanities general education requirement.

Fall 2014
Course Section Course Title Professors Gen Eds Fulfilled Credits
HON 101-B Grappling with Evil: Lecture Dr. Tanya Randle & Dr. Micah Kiel Philosophy + Theology 4
SVLN 201-B Service Learning Jessica Nash 1
HON 112-B Speaker Series Dr. Brenda Peters 1

Honors 102B (Spring)

Food, Faith, and Justice

Americans are in many ways fascinated with food. We read magazines like Martha Stewart Living and watch reality television competitions such as Top Chef. The Food Network has spawned dozens of "celebrity chefs." At the same time, a record number of Americans qualify for the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. One in five American children lives in a household that is food insecure. World wheat prices have increased as a result of climate change, forcing the poorest 2 billion people on the Earth to spend 50-70% of their incomes on food. And still there are 1 billion hungry in the world, according to the UN. Race, gender, class, ethnicity, regional culture, and religion deeply influence access to adequate nutrition around the globe. These phenomena are not only political challenges, but spiritual ones.

This course will examine ethical, theological, and historical issues associated with hunger, food scarcity, food technologies, climate change, and disparities between the First World and developing nations.

Spring 2015
Course Section Course Title Professors Gen Eds Fulfilled Credits
HON 102-B Food, Faith, and Justice Dr. Keri Manning & Dr. Mara Adams Humanities 3


HONORS 201 Course Options: Sophomores


Honors 201A (Fall)

The African-American Religious Experience

This interdisciplinary course examines the African American Religious Experience from the perspectives of Theology, Sociology, History and Anthropology. The focus of this course is on the experiences of African Americans in the United States from "Before the Mayflower" to the present. The course addresses the issues of community, assimilation and minority status for African American subcultures in their historical context. Particular emphasis is placed on the relationship of America's definitional "other" in relation to a dynamic, changing dominant culture and the development and utilization of critical thinking skills through a sociological-anthropological, theological and historical examination of societal inequality in American culture.

Fall 2014
Course  Section    Course Title Professor Gen Eds Fulfilled Credits
HON-201-A The African-American Religious Experience Dr. Tom Carpenter Humantities 3

Honors 201A (Spring)

Nutrition in the 21st Century

Nutrition in the 21st Century will include investigations into current world trends in the realms of science, economics, and population growth. The growth of scientific discovery is progressing at an exponential pace, aided by technology. This fact leads to an increasing demand for the ability to sift through the available knowledge and extract the most current and reliable information, in this case on the subject of nutrition. The topic of nutrition is gaining importance and publicity in the U.S. and around the world and an increasing quantity of evidence suggests disturbing trends of increased obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other health issues that correlate very closely with lifestyle and nutrition choices.

Philosophy of the Body

Historically, philosophy has given all attention to the mind in response to the question of what it means to be human. After all, we are the "rational" animal. In contrast, the human body is little discussed and, when it is, is usually interpreted as a hindrance to the quest of knowledge. This course will highlight the significance of the body in any attempt to address the essence of self. The work of Merleau-Ponty and Sokolowski will be the main sources in which we can begin to interpret who we are in a new light.

Spring 2015
Course Section Course Title Professor Gen Eds Fulfilled Credits
HON-201-A Nutrition in the 21st Century Amy Gorowsky Natural Science 3
HON-201-B Philosophy of the Body Dr. Rich Blomgren Philosophy 3