More Than An Ornamental Success


02/08/2017

It's like combining chocolate and peanut butter. Only with fewer calories. And more learning.

When leaders of Enactus, an SAU student organization geared to promote entrepreneurial action with a social justice perspective, were looking to raise funds last fall they turned to the president of the Engineering Club for help in creating a production model.

Enactus President Jillian Joyce and Vice President Griffin Rasche teamed with Engineering Club President Katelyn Schroder to form a partnership called the Ambrose Design Hive.

"The main idea was to show engineering students how the business side of a business works and to show business students how the manufacturing happens," Joyce said. "Along with that, it would raise money for both of our clubs so we could fund projects and have money to participate in competitions and such."

In tandem, the business and engineering organizations created and then marketed Christmas ornaments out of wood found on campus, engraved with St. Ambrose themed messages. Together, the students built and sold more than 200 ornaments.

"The engineering side took care of the engraving and proper cutting of the wood," Rasche told reporter Kaylee Golden in a story published in the Feb. 2 edition of The Buzz. "While, the business side created the packaging and handled the marketing side of the business."

The Ambrose Design Hive will remain open for future business, with the idea of creating and selling more SAU-oriented tchotchkes. "To be a part of Design Hive students must be a member of Enactus or the Engineering Club," Joyce said. "However, the good news is that Enactus is open to students of all majors, so everyone is welcome!"

Read The Buzz story.

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